ancientpeoples:

Faience feeding cup 
This cup was used to feed babies and infants. The decoration on the sides are the same as those on magical wands, used for the protection of the child. From left to right: the goddess Taweret, a griffin, a snake, a lion and a turtle. 
Found in Lisht, the Memphis area, found in the west corner of the pyramid cemetery 
Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1850 - 1700 BC.
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Faience feeding cup 

This cup was used to feed babies and infants. The decoration on the sides are the same as those on magical wands, used for the protection of the child. From left to right: the goddess Taweret, a griffin, a snake, a lion and a turtle. 

Found in Lisht, the Memphis area, found in the west corner of the pyramid cemetery 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 12th dynasty, 1850 - 1700 BC.

Source: Metropolitan Museum

medievalpoc:

Anonymous Artist (Constantinople)
Medallion with Saint George From an Icon Frame
Byzantine (c. 1100)
Cloisonné enamel, gold, D. 8.3 cm.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

medievalpoc:

Anonymous Artist (Constantinople)

Medallion with Saint George From an Icon Frame

Byzantine (c. 1100)

Cloisonné enamel, gold, D. 8.3 cm.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

ancientpeoples:

Limestone ancestor bust
These busts were used to contact the ancestors in the privacy of the private home. These statues were placed in niches inside the home and offerings could be made there to the ancestors. Because these ancestors were already in the afterlife, they could work on behalf of an individual who gave offerings. However, an upset ancestor could also make a decendent sick or give him or her bad fortune. 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 19th dynasty, 1320 - 1237 BC. 
Probably from Upper Egypt, Thebes, Deir el Medina. 
Source: metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Limestone ancestor bust

These busts were used to contact the ancestors in the privacy of the private home. These statues were placed in niches inside the home and offerings could be made there to the ancestors. Because these ancestors were already in the afterlife, they could work on behalf of an individual who gave offerings. However, an upset ancestor could also make a decendent sick or give him or her bad fortune. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 19th dynasty, 1320 - 1237 BC. 

Probably from Upper Egypt, Thebes, Deir el Medina. 

Source: metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta oil lamp 
4cm high and 9.2cm wide. 
Roman, Late Imperial Period, 3rd century AD. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Terracotta oil lamp 

4cm high and 9.2cm wide. 

Roman, Late Imperial Period, 3rd century AD. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

medievalpoc:

Hans Jakob Mair
Black Warrior Riding a Hippocamp
Germany (1665)
Silver, Gold, Enamel, 41 cm.
Read “How a Black Warrior Became a Symbol for a German Fraternal Society” by Sheldon Creek here.

medievalpoc:

Hans Jakob Mair

Black Warrior Riding a Hippocamp

Germany (1665)

Silver, Gold, Enamel, 41 cm.

Read “How a Black Warrior Became a Symbol for a German Fraternal Society” by Sheldon Creek here.

ancientpeoples:

Steatite kohl holder in shape of monkey
6cm high and 4 cm wide (2 3/8 x 1 5/8 inch.) 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, 1550 - 1450 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Steatite kohl holder in shape of monkey

6cm high and 4 cm wide (2 3/8 x 1 5/8 inch.) 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, 1550 - 1450 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Golden solidus of Valentinian 
2cm in diameter (13 / 16 inch.) 
Byzantine Period, 365 - 374 AD. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Golden solidus of Valentinian 

2cm in diameter (13 / 16 inch.) 

Byzantine Period, 365 - 374 AD. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Limestone dubble statue of Mahu 
This pair is made for the burial chamber and is meant as a house in which the deceased’s soul could inhabit if it wanted. The owners are shown in their best outfit and wigs. This style is typical of the 18th dynasty; the young faces, the dubble wigs and the style of the dresses. 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, after 1450 BC. 
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Limestone dubble statue of Mahu 

This pair is made for the burial chamber and is meant as a house in which the deceased’s soul could inhabit if it wanted. The owners are shown in their best outfit and wigs. This style is typical of the 18th dynasty; the young faces, the dubble wigs and the style of the dresses. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, after 1450 BC. 

Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Relief of Antelopes
Egyptian
ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E.
The scene to which this block once belonged probably showed a desert hunting party. The hunters, Akhenaten and his entourage, would have appeared in chariots bearing down on their helpless prey. Their approach has not gone unnoticed: the ears of the two bubalis antelopes perk up at the sound of danger. The back of a third antelope may be seen in the lower right corner. Such isolated blocks provide a hint of the complex decorative schemes that once existed in the palace at el Amarna.
Source: Brooklyn Museum

ancientpeoples:

Relief of Antelopes

Egyptian

ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E.

The scene to which this block once belonged probably showed a desert hunting party. The hunters, Akhenaten and his entourage, would have appeared in chariots bearing down on their helpless prey. Their approach has not gone unnoticed: the ears of the two bubalis antelopes perk up at the sound of danger. The back of a third antelope may be seen in the lower right corner. Such isolated blocks provide a hint of the complex decorative schemes that once existed in the palace at el Amarna.

Source: Brooklyn Museum

ancientpeoples:

Cat with Kittens
Egyptian
ca. 644-30 B.C.
The Egyptians associated the female cat’s fertility and motherly care with several divinities. The base of the statuette of Cat with Kittens is inscribed with a request that Bastet grant life, directly linking the cat pictured here with the goddess Bastet. The kittens here point to the benevolent aspect of this feline divinity, while her pointed ears emphasize the feline’s attentive vigilance and ability to protect its young.
Source: Brooklyn Museum

ancientpeoples:

Cat with Kittens

Egyptian

ca. 644-30 B.C.

The Egyptians associated the female cat’s fertility and motherly care with several divinities. The base of the statuette of Cat with Kittens is inscribed with a request that Bastet grant life, directly linking the cat pictured here with the goddess Bastet. The kittens here point to the benevolent aspect of this feline divinity, while her pointed ears emphasize the feline’s attentive vigilance and ability to protect its young.

Source: Brooklyn Museum